Brain food: 6 snacks that are good for the mind. What can you eat to make you smarter?

Eating well doesn’t just boost your strength – the nutrients in food are also excellent fuel for the brain. US scientists have discovered that a handful of walnuts a day can help improve your memory. Adults who ate 13g of walnuts every day performed significantly better on cognitive tests than those who didn’t, and so walnuts have been added to the growing list of foods for geniuses. But what other snacks can make you smarter? Here’s a few of the foods you should eat to help strengthen your brain.

 

Blueberries

Researchers from Tufts University found that blueberries don’t simply improve memory – they can actually reverse memory loss. A study published in the Journal of Neuroscience found an extract of blueberries eaten every day led to a reversal of nerve cell damage in rats. After eating their daily dose of berries, the rodents learned faster, had a better short-term memory and had improved balance and co-ordination. The humble blueberry is truly a superfood for your brain cells.

 

Salmon

Some healthy eating devotees take a regular dose of pure fish oil but if you can’t stomach the dietary supplement, eating plenty of salmon is an excellent alternative. Salmon is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which are crucial for a healthy diet, and offers a sizeable portion of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Not only are fatty acids good for the heart, but DHA has also been found to boost neuron function in the brain.

 

Avocado

Avocados may be fatty, but they contain extremely healthy unsaturated fats, which help to keep brain cell membranes flexible. The monounsaturated fatty acids in avocadoes work to protect nerve cells in the brain and have been found to improve the brain’s muscle strength. The same fats lead to healthy blood flow and lower blood pressure and both of these, in turn, help the brain to function at its optimum capacity.

 

Whole Grains

The brain is like all other bodily organs and relies on a steady flow of energy to perform at its best. Our concentration skills are linked to the brain’s supply of glucose. Whole grains with a low GI (glycaemic index) are a healthy brain food as they slowly and steadily release glucose into the bloodstream. Other carbohydrates are a more unstable source of glucose – white rice and pasta will cause energy levels to peak and then crash, leaving your brain feeling weak and exhausted.

 

Broccoli

Broccoli is a source of two crucial nutrients that help improve brain function. Vitamin K helps to strengthen cognitive abilities while Choline has been found to improve memory – people who eat plenty of broccoli perform better on memory tests. Broccoli also includes a sizeable serving of folic acid, which can help ward off Alzheimer’s disease. Studies suggest that a lack of folic acid could lead to depression, so eating plenty of broccoli could also keep you happy.

 

Dark Chocolate

Who says that healthy food can’t be delicious? Cocoa can improve verbal fluency and cognitive function in elderly people, while eating a daily portion of dark chocolate has been found to improve blood flow to the brain. So don’t feel guilty about that chocolate bar – your brain will thank you.

 

 

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Think organic food is better for you, animals, and the planet? Think again

What we eat is seen as more important than ever. And everywhere we are urged to go organic: we are told it is more nutritious, it improves animal welfare and helps the environment. In reality, that is mostly marketing hype.

In 2012 Stanford University’s Centre for Health Policy did the biggest comparison of organic and conventional foods and found no robust evidence for organics being more nutritious. A brand-new reviewhas just repeated its finding: “Scientific studies do not show that organic products are more nutritious and safer than conventional foods.”

Likewise, animals on organic farms are not generally healthier. A five year US study showed that organic “health outcomes are similar to conventional dairies”. The Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety found “no difference in objective disease occurrence.” Organic pigs and poultry may enjoy better access to open areas, but this increases their load of parasites, pathogens and predators. Meanwhile the organic regulation against feeding bee colonies with pollen supplements in low-pollen periods along with regulation against proper disinfection leads to sharply lower bee welfare.

Organic farming is sold as good for the environment. This is correct for a single farm field: organic farming uses less energy, emits less greenhouse gasses, nitrous oxide and ammonia and causes less nitrogen leeching than a conventional field. But each organic field yields much, much less. So, to grow the same amount of wheat, spinach or strawberries, you need much more land. That means that average organic produce results in the emission of about as many greenhouse gasses as conventional produce; and about 10 per cent more nitrous oxide, ammonia and acidification. Worse, to produce equivalent quantities, organic farms need to occupy 84 per cent more land – land which can’t be used for forests and genuine nature reserves. For example, to produce the amount of food America does today, but organically, would require increasing its farmland by the size of almost two United Kingdoms. That is the equivalent of eradicating all parklands and wild lands in the lower 48 states.

But surely organics avoid pesticides? No. Organic farming can use any pesticide that is “natural”. This includes copper sulphate, which has resulted in liver disease in vineyard sprayers in France. Pyrethrin is another organic pesticide; one study shows a 3.7-fold increase in leukaemia among farmers who handled pyrethrins compared to those who had not.

Conventional food, it’s true, has higher pesticide contamination. Although it is still very low, this is a definite benefit of organics. However, using a rough upper estimate by the head of the US Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Toxicology, all conventional pesticide residues may cause an extra 20 cancer deaths per year in America.

This pales in comparison to the impact of organics. If all of the United States were to go organic, the cost would likely be around $200 billion annually from lower productivity. This is money we can’t spend on hospitals, pensioner care, schools, or infrastructure.

Such economic impacts also have life and death consequences. Research shows that when a nation becomes $15 million poorer, it costs one “statistical” life, because people are able to spend less on health care and good food. This means that going organic in the US will kill more than 13,000 people each year. Scaling these findings to the UK would indicate that while extra pesticides in conventional cause perhaps four deaths each year, the UK going completely organic would cost £22 billion per year, resulting in more than 2,000 extra deaths each year.

Organics is a rich world phenomenon, with 90 per cent of sales in North America and Europe. Despite a fivefold increase in sales over the past 15 years just 1 per cent of global cropland is organic. That’s because almost half of humanity depends on food grown with synthetic fertilisers, excluded by organic rules.

Norman Borlaug, who got the Nobel Prize for starting the Green Revolution, like to point out, that organic farming on a global scale would leave billions without food. “I don’t see two billion volunteers to disappear,” he said.

Essentially, organic food is rich people spending their extra cash to feel good. While that is just as valid as spending it on holidays, we should resist any implied moral superiority. Organics are not healthier or better for animals. To expand to any great scale would cost tens of billions of pounds while killing thousands. Indeed, a widespread organics revolution will increase environmental damage, and cut global forests.

When the designer Vivienne Westwood famously exclaimed that people who can’t afford organic food should “eat less” she may have had the best intentions. But she was also incredibly out of touch. The rest of the world needs more and cheaper food. That isn’t going to be organic.

 

 

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

8 Food trends you will see in 2019

1. “Ugly” food will shine.

Food companies have long been in the habit of trashing ingredients that aren’t pretty enough to sell, but conscious consumers are catching wind. The battle against food waste isn’t new—chef Dan Barber’s wasteED campaign encourages the use of food scraps and “ugly” produce in restaurants, and plenty of farmers and merchants outside of the big supermarket chains have never been shy about selling misshapen goods. But it’ll gain even more momentum in 2019.

2. Faux meat will be your go-to snack.

According to the Whole Foods report, snacks like mushroom-based faux cracklin’, soy-based jerky, and mushroom “bacon chips” will continue to gain momentum in 2019, as an alternative to classic packaged meat snacks like beef jerky and pork rinds.

Taub-Dix is on board with this shift to faux-meat snacks. “The protein that comes from plant foods can count towards your daily intake,” she says. While individual plant-based proteins aren’t complete proteins, you can get all of the essential amino acids (the building blocks of both protein and our own lean tissue) by eating several different types of plant-based protein.

Meat alternative snacks made with vegetables, like mushrooms, generally don’t have much protein, but are still a nutritious snack choice. Just keep noshing on other healthy plant based snacks, too, advises Taub-Dix.

3. Coconut water will have competition.

For years, coconut water has been marketed (to great success) as a hydration miracle, hangover cure, and all-around delicious alternative to regular old water. In 2019, look out for other alternative waters to take over the beverage case.

The KIND Healthy Snacks Trend Report calls out two in particular: “Maple water, which contains less than half of the sugar of coconut water, as well as cactus water, which is promoted for skin revitalization.” While these slightly sweet waters won’t hurt you, the Academy of Nutrition Dietetics says to be wary of their lofty claims. They won’t do a better job of hydrating you than regular old H20, and they have sugar without any fiber, so drinking too much could lead to a blood sugar spike.

4. Vitamins and supplements are on the outs.

Although we’re more wellness-obsessed than ever, the KIND trend report predicts that processed vitamins and supplements will finally be on their way out. Instead, we’re shifting toward a sharper focus on meeting nutrient needs with whole foods. This isn’t new. The USDA dietary guidelines clearly state that “nutritional needs should be met primarily from foods, and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has long advised meeting nutrient needs by eating as varied a diet as possible, instead of relying on expensive vitamins and supplements (which, BTW, don’t need FDA approval and may not even contain the nutrients they say they do).

5. Jackfruit will be the new go-to meat substitute.

Jackfruit is a popular meat alternative already being used in place of items like barbecue pulled pork,” according to the Whole Foods trend report. The fruit is native to Southeast Asia, and is also grown in parts of Africa and South America. Americans have been using it as a meat substitute for a few years now (thanks to a stringy texture that mimics pulled pork or beef), but 2019 will be the year that pulled jackfruit really takes off.

6. You might finally learn how to bake bread.

“Bread baking is on the rise, especially when it comes to fermented loaves like sourdough,” according to the Pinterest’s 100 top trends for 2019. Kuhn agrees that people are increasingly interested in cooking more at home, and that baking bread can be a fun and delicious culinary experience.

But, she says it’s still totally fine to just buy your loaf. “On the market today, there are a lot of extremely healthy breads, so you can find great options,” she says. Look for 100-percent whole grain on the label, and mix things up by trying a bread baked with a new-to-you grain, like amaranth or kamut.

7. Your grocery shopping experience will go high-tech.

Tired of going to the Supermarket and sue at the check-out lane? Now many Supermarket chains and even Amazon offer to purchase all of your food items directly online, then deliver to your doorstep. You get fresh, chilled and frozen foods with a click of the mouse, delivered daily. Great for elderly and people who are not

8. Your fruit basket will get a tropical spin.

Sick of kiwi, blueberries? You may be in luck.                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Whole Foods is predicting that tropical fruits like guava, dragonfruit, starfruit, and passionfruit will take center stage this year.

If you’re sick of your usual apple a day, swap in one of these tropical fruits every once in a while. Different fruits have slightly different nutrient profiles, but all are packed with fiber, vitamins, and healthy carbs, explains Keri Gans, R.D., author of The Small Change Diet. Any type of fruit is a great choice for a snack or as part of a meal, and changing things up can help keep you excited about getting your five-a-day.

source: www.womanshealthmag.com

McDonald’s gives up control of Chinese business in £1.7bn deal

McDonald’s is giving up the controlling stake in its Chinese business to a state-owned conglomerate as part of a global strategy to sell off more of its restaurants.
Beijing-backed Citic and Citic Capital Holdings will take a 52pc stake in McDonald’s restaurants in China and Hong Kong, while US-based Carlyle Group will control another 28pc.
The US fast food giant will retain the final 20pc as part of the deal, which it said was worth $2.08bn (£1.7bn).

Sales in China were hit last year as protests were staged against US companies amid a diplomatic spat between Beijing and Washington over the South China Sea.
McDonald’s has grown rapidly in China since it opened its first store in 1990, but is facing stiff competition from Asian brands such as Dicos and Real Kung Fu, which also offers noodles and rice dishes.
The new Chinese investor group plans to open a further 1,500 restaurants in the country’s second- and third-tier cities.
Experts claim a shifting diet towards burgers and pizzas has created an obesity explosion in China, particularly in less affluent inland areas.
But the new consortium will aim to capitalise on growing demand among the middle classes for healthier fast food options.
McDonald’s had previously announced plans for 4,000 of its global restaurants to be converted into franchises by the end of 2018.
Ninety-five percent of its restaurants will be converted in the longer term, it said.
This strategy enables McDonald’s to continue to take a slice of profits but cut down on operating costs.
The company is also facing tough competition in China from Yum Brands, which owns KFC and Pizza Hut.
Last year Yum created a new domestic business, Yum China, which plans to add 600 restaurants a year in China in the next five years.
McDonald’s has more than 2,400 restaurants in mainland China and 240 in Hong Kong. The deal will see 1,750 being converted into franchises.
Zhang Yichen, chairman and chief executive of CITIC Capital, will serve as chairman of the new venture.
“McDonald’s has strong growth potential in the Chinese market,” he said.
The deal will need to be approved by regulators in China but is expected to be completed this summer.

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2017/01/09/mcdonalds-gives-control-chinese-business-17bn-deal/

Starbucks to stop selling alcohol at more than 400 US stores

NEW YORK (AP) — Starbucks will stop selling beer and wine at more than 400 U.S. stores next week as it ends its “evenings” program.

The coffee chain says the “Starbucks Evenings” program in 439 company-owned stores in the U.S. will end Jan. 10. It said the program may continue in some of the nine licensed stores where it is offered, or overseas. The program was first tested in 2010 near Starbucks’ headquarters in Seattle, and was expanded as a way to drive sales beyond the morning rush. In addition to alcohol, the evening menu featured foods like bacon-wrapped dates.

Starbucks said in 2014 it planned to expand alcohol to “thousands” of stores. Now, it says it will integrate beer and wine into its higher-end retail format, such as Roastery stores.

Souce: http://bigstory.ap.org/article/6ec0e07280d44029841f6e3d2429a8eb/starbucks-stop-selling-alcohol-more-400-us-stores

Culinary trends to watch for in 2017

In the world of food, one thing is certain: Every year is sure to be more exciting than the last.

Chefs push boundaries a little more each year, challenging our taste buds with what they put on our plates. Home cooks gain confidence with every meal, which leads to cooking led by intuition – often the best kind. Farmers harvest new produce, inviting us to take chances on unfamiliar ingredients grown in our own backyards.

Even the very idea of eating evolves with each passing year: The tradition of sitting down to three home-cooked meals has made way for a culture that enjoys breakfasts on the go, healthful snacks throughout the day and dinners comprised out of small plates.

So what does 2017 have in store for us? According to industry experts who predict food trends each year, we can look forward to ethnic flavors and spices, food halls, house-made charcuterie, artisan ice creams, and vegetables as the stars of a meal.

We gathered information from the National Restaurant Association, which polls more than 1,000 professional chefs each year; The James Beard Foundation and restaurant consulting firm Baum + Whiteman; read on for a detailed look at what you will be eating this year.

Spice things up

First things first – get yourself a jar of turmeric. The yellow powder, prized for its anti-inflammatory properties, is most often found in curries but has many other uses in the kitchen. Stir it into scrambled eggs and soups, toss with roasted vegetables, mix into smoothies or blend with almond milk and grated ginger for a soothing drink. Start with a small amount: The flavor is mild and earthy but slightly bitter.

Other spices to try this year are harissa, a North African hot chili pepper paste or powder; peri peri, a South African hot sauce made with African bird’s eye chillies; ras el hanout, a spicy and floral Moroccan blend of more than a dozen spices; and shichimi, a Japanese mixture made with ground chiles, tangerine peel and flakes of nori, or dried seaweed.

If you need a little sweet with your spice, no worries: “As a nation we seem to have crossed the fine line between pleasure and pain,” said Baum + Whiteman. “But smart chefs are balancing the heat, often with sweetness.”

FIND IT: The hot chicken biscuit – fried chicken with hot sauce and honey on a homemade biscuit – served during brunch at Cardinal Provisions in Asbury Park; Korean fried chicken wings with a sauce of honey tobanjan, a spicy miso condiment, at Teak in Red Bank.

Bowled over

Every foodie with an Instagram account will tell you – food in bowls is where it’s at: oatmeal bowls, smoothie bowls, grain bowls. Things just seem to taste better when arranged in a big bowl, and the experts agree.

New Year Blowout
$19.99
for your first year
ACT NOW
“It all began innocuously with acai bowls for breakfast and then spread to fast-casual (restaurants) when chains discovered their customers were rejecting breads and wraps in favor of greens and grains,” according to Baum + Whiteman. “Office workers are discovering that takeaway bowls are less likely to spatter their laps and laptops, and chefs are finding that assembling a decorous bowl is easier and faster than the complexity of plating upscale entrees because they don’t have to fuss around with all that white space.

“What’s more,” they say. “if you hold a bowl Buddha-like while eating, you are psychologically more prone to mindfulness about your meal. You’ll also stand a better chance of catching all the flavors and textures with every bite and think you’re full a lot faster, even if you chuck the white carbs.”

FIND IT: Ramen – chicken or Berkshire pork belly with soft-boiled eggs – at Cornerstone Kitchen & Tap in Jackson; polenta with grilled halloumi cheese, chile and cilantro at Talula’s in Asbury Park

Vegetables as the star

“Vegetables in 2017 will extend their domination of the dinner plate, shoving animal protein to the edges – or off the plate altogether,” experts say. “We’re seeing a surge of serious chefs tilting their menus toward vegetables, but equally significant is the commotion among fast-casual chains.”

This refers to places like Sweetgreen, with locations in New York and across the country, and Beefsteak in Washington D.C.: Both are heavily focused on vegetables and have been very well received.

“It is no secret that Americans are eating less meat (26% of consumers said so last year) and that vegetarian/flexitarian diets (are) going mainstream,” reports Baum + Whiteman.

The James Beard Foundation says cauliflower is the new kale; the oft-overlooked cruciferous veggie has been growing in popularity lately. Chefs chop it small and use it in place of rice and to make pizza crusts, and some even serve thickly sliced “steaks” as an entree.

FIND IT: Zoodles, or yellow and green zucchini “noodles,” with asparagus pesto at Harvest Local Seasonal Cuisine in Farmingdale; wild mushroom tacos at The Belmonte in Red Bank; cauliflower-topped pizza at B2 Bistro + Bar in Red Bank

Ice cream evolution

For a few years, mint chocolate chip was all the rage. Then came fro-yo and vegan ice cream.

This year, things are going to get a little crazier.

Last year, Joe D’Esposito opened an ice cream shop in Belmar that specializes in scoops served in fresh-baked waffles. Then he started making an outrageous dessert that experts predict will be everywhere this year.

D’Esposito calls his creation the sideshow shake; the confection is an Australian-born treat known there as the freakshake. “They’re pretty wild,” he said. “It’s a milkshake with ice cream piled on top and all kinds of (toppings) stuck to it, like giant lollipops, cotton candy, chocolate-covered potato chips or pretzels, caramel corn.”

Keeping with the veggie craze, trend watchers predict the rise of ice creams and pops made with avocado, sweet corn, sweet pepper, sweet potato and pumpkin.

A third ice cream trend is Thai rolled ice cream, which starts with liquid ice cream base poured onto an icy cold metal plate. It is scraped quickly with metal paddles, add-ins are mixed in, then it firms and is shaped into rolls.

FIND IT: Sideshow shakes at Coney Waffle in Belmar; Burger 25 in Toms River, which on occasion tops shakes doughnuts from Uncle Dood’s in the township; Thai rolled ice cream at Angel’s Recipe Ice Cream in Hoboken

Meals on demand

Work, school, kids’ activities, exercise – people are busy these days. While busy people need to eat, busy people don’t always have time to shop or cook.

“Peapod, the country’s leading online grocer, recently found that most Americans (70 percent) cook the majority of their weekly dinners at home at least four nights a week, so it’s no surprise services that make it easier to do so are on the rise,” said Baum + Whiteman, which included meal kits on its list of top 10 food concept trends for 2017.

That’s where meal kit services come in. These gained major traction last year; think Blue Apron, HelloFresh and Plated. They eliminate the need to grocery shop and send pre-measured ingredients and recipes to your door.

For those who want to skip the cooking, meal delivery services are heating up, too. These are businesses run by chefs and food professionals who put effort into preparing healthy, satisfying, home-cooked food.

FIND IT: Deliboy Delivery in Old Bridge, Harbour Trading in Red Bank, Cavé in Avon, Eat Clean Bro in Freehold

WHAT TO WATCH FOR

1. Sorghum: Hailed as the new “it” grain, sorghum has more bite than couscous and is slightly sweet. The ancient grain also is gluten free.

2. New cuts of meat: shoulder tender, oyster steak, Vegas strip steak, Merlot cut

3. Street food-inspired dishes: tempura, kabobs, dumplings, pupusas (a thick, stuffed corn tortilla)

4. Savory desserts

5. Horseradish

6. Radishes

7. Jackfruit: This huge Asian fruit does double duty: Before it ripens, the meaty flesh makes a great substitute for pulled pork or chicken. Once ripened, it is sweet and juicy.

8. War on waste: Veggie extras are being turned into condiments and toppings.

9. Meat aged in whisky, sake lees (the remnants of sake production) and miso powder.

10. Caccio e pepe: In English, cheese and pepper. Traditionally found on pasta, the combination is being used to add flavor to veggies and meat.

source: http://www.dailyrecord.com/story/life/2017/01/10/culinary-trends-watch/96414058/

Hilton takes service to the next level

Hilton Team Members contributed 291,000 volunteer hours during the company’s Global Month of Service.

The annual event is part of Hilton’s Travel with Purpose corporate responsibility programme and this year saw Team Members from 93 countries contribute more than 291,000 volunteer hours to 4,166 community projects around the world. Global Month of Service is a celebration of the community engagement efforts throughout the entire year.

Christopher J. Nassetta, president and CEO of Hilton said, “A core part of Hilton’s mission is to have a lasting, positive impact on the thousands of communities where we live, work and travel, and that is the inspiration for our annual Global Month of Service. This year, our Team Members worked together to demonstrate a commitment to service by sharing their unique hospitality skills in truly inspiring ways.”

Throughout October, Hilton collaborated with hundreds of organizations across the globe to participate in service projects from outdoor garden classrooms to mentorship programs to youth workshops. Projects aligned with Travel with Purpose’s three priority areas: creating opportunities, strengthening communities and preserving the environment.

Creating Opportunities

In Cameroon, Hilton Yaoundé opened its doors to 35 local students from Sorawell Professional Training Center for Women, an organization that provides hospitality training to young women from disadvantaged backgrounds. The hotel held a week-long series of workshops with the students and a two-year apprenticeship was awarded to one student that excelled during the week.
Strengthening Communities

In the United States, more than 100 Team Members from Hilton’s headquarters in McLean, Virginia partnered with REAL School Gardens, a local organization that unites teachers, parents, businesses and students to create learning gardens tailored to specific school needs. Team Members spent the day alongside the students building raised plant beds, installing outdoor white boards and planting seasonal vegetables for children to grow.
In Singapore, Team Members from Hilton’s regional office joined forces with Hilton Singapore to prepare, cook, pack and deliver more than 5,000 meals to the local community in Singapore. During the event, Team Members were able to participate in a number of different roles preparing and serving in the kitchen.
Hilton has been dedicated to spreading its hospitality from properties into local communities for nearly 100 years. While community service is highlighted during October, Hilton’s Team Members dedicate their time, passion and unique brand of hospitality to create positive change throughout the entire year. Since 2012, Hilton Team Members have completed more than 14,960 projects worldwide and contributed more than 804,620 hours of community service.

Source: http://www.greenhotelier.org/our-themes/community-communication-engagement/hilton-takes-service-to-the-next-level/

Luke Mangan to launch burger concept

Luke Mangan is the latest chef to enter the competitive burger sector, with the Chicken Confidential brand expected to launch in January 2017.

The first location is slated for Sydney, however five outlets are expected to open across Australia, as well as further expansion plans across Asia in the next 18 months.

From 7 to 22 December, Mangan – who also operates Hilton’s glass Brasserie – will give the restaurant’s lunch time bar guests the opportunity to taste Chicken Confidential’s chicken burger.

Mangan operates 19 different restaurants across five countries as well as the food offering for Virgin Australia’s Business Class, on P&O cruise ships and on-board Eastern & Oriental Express.

Chicken Confidential’s menu will offer fried chicken in a range of wraps, burgers and salads with the chicken supplied by Inglewood Fresh Organic Free Range Chicken.

Mangan is joined by other leading Australian chefs also operating in the burger sector: Warren Turnbull (Chur Burger), Neil Perry (Burger Project), Shannon Bennett (Benny Burger) and Daniel Wilson (Huxtaburger).

Source: http://www.hospitalitymagazine.com.au/food/news/luke-mangan-to-launch-burger-concept

Design Forecast: 10 Trends to Watch for in 2016

As we close the door on 2015, lets take a look at what the design industry experts are saying about the coming year. As modern life gets busier and more pressured, our homes have become our sanctuaries. Centered around simplicity, serenity and seamlessness, the 2016 interior reflects our need to switch off and detox. Warm but calming colors are complimented by natural textures and soft shapes while furniture is becoming ever more tailored and intuitive, both at home and in the office.

Global color authority Pantone surprised the design community by naming not one but two colors for the 2016 edition of its Color of the Year forecast. The pastel pink Rose Quartz and powder blue Serenity may seem like a sugary sweet selection but according to Pantone, the pairing is in fact part of a more unilateral approach to color—a commentary on the current societal movements toward gender equality and fluidity.

Chiming with Pantone’s prediction, British wallpaper brand Graham & Brown’s 2016 forecast was full of dusty pinks and pale blues enlivened with warm metallic accents. Demonstrating how these contrasting shades can be united within a single design, Calico Studios prove that they were way ahead of the curve when they launched their Aurora line of wallpapers last year. Inspired by ombre skies, the 16 gradient designs were created by dying organic linen with ultramarine and indigo dyes.
Design Detox

“Comfort Zone” by Valspar.

Offering a complete color palette cleanse, some of the major wallpaper and paint brands are moving towards quiet and calming hues for 2016. New York-based hospitality designer and entrepreneur Stacy Garcia tells us ‘the growing emphasis on this need to always be connected has created a movement to find quiet simplicity amongst the noise.’

Signaling a move away from cold greys to warm stone hues in 2016, Sherwin-Williams has announced Alabaster (SW 7008), a hue symbolic of new beginnings, as its 2016 Color of the Year. Also wiping the slate clean is paint brand Benjamin Moore, who has selected Simply White OC-117 shade as its 2016 Color of the Year while Valspar paint says that its restorative 2016 color palette ‘Comfort Zone’ is an antidote to a ‘fast-paced lifestyle’ and will ‘balance the mind, body and spirit.’
Warm Metals

Arik Levy’s Bowl collection for Inbani.

Particularly effective in the bathroom and kitchen space, rose gold, brass, copper and gold will continue to dominate in 2016 according to London-based interior designer Gemma Gordon-Duff of Gordon–Duff & Linton who suggests pairing them with raw, natural materials such as marble and wood. “Good quality materials like this are a great investment because they will never go out of style,” she advises.

Made of a copper and gold alloy mixture, the 18-carat patina of Dornbracht’s non-corrosive electroplated surface Cyprum is the first new finish to be launched by Dornbracht since 2009. Patricia Urquiola’s two-part Cuna bath for Agape features a thermoformed solid surface tub supported by a tubular copper frame. Arik Levy’s Bowl collection for Spanish bathroom brand Inbani mixes white ceramic with copper and marble details.
Rough Luxe

John Whitmarsh’s new cement tile collections for Clé.

“Instant aging of materials and adding texture and depth to a space always helps add to the experience,” says Jon Sherman Founder & Creative Director of Brooklyn-based wallpaper company Flavor Paper, who predicts that papers that mimic industrial finishes will be big news in 2016.

“Being able to add some grime or roughness to a very sterile environment adds an unexpected touch and intrigues the senses,” says Sherman of Flavor Paper’s textural designs, Teardrop Wall, Charred Cedar and Galapagos Wall, which bring roughness into the interior but without the cost, weight and problematic depth. Similarly Piet Hein Eek’s latest tromp l’oeil effect papers for manufacturer NLXL resemble architectural materials such as painted bricks and salvaged wood. Sculptor John Whitmarsh’s new cement tile collections for Clé are made by taking gypsum cement castings from reclaimed materials such as pallets, roadside guardrail posts, and discarded metals
Customized Interior

Custom furniture by Tylko.

2015 saw a slew of online furniture brands launch onto the market offering their customers the ability to customize and order furniture online to their own unique specifications. The trend looks set to continue into 2016 as these new online companies establish themselves and reach a wider audience.

Jason Goldberg’s new flat-pack furniture brand Hem offers a slick set of customization tools on its website that allow customers to pick fabrics, sizes and configurations to suit their individual space. With a big focus on the development of complex algorithms and 3D software, new Poland-based furniture brand Tylko allows customers to not only customize colors and finishes but to also create furniture with its own unique shape and form. Launched this year at NeoCon, ShopFloor makes use of generative algorithms and 3D software to facilitate streamlined production of customized furniture designs including wall coverings, perforated metal panels and a snaking aluminum bench by Jonathan Olivares.
Retro Tech

Serif TV by Samsung.

Technology is softening its edges and moving away from the impersonal, hard lined approach of the past. Like the early domestic technology of the 1950s and 60s, the latest devices are part of the furniture.

Samsung’s Serif TV is bringing back the mid twentieth century concept of the stylized TV. With its I-shaped profile and a magnetic fabric panel at the rear that conceals messy wires and plugs, Serif is challenging the perception of what a flatscreen TV should look like. Packaged in a soft-edged, stitched leather carry case that blends 1960s styling with cutting edge technology, Michael Young’s new portable Bluetooth speaker for Italian brand Brionvega is inspired by one of the Italian brand’s earliest products, the TS 207 portable radio designed by Rodolfo Bonetto. Recognizing a gap in the market for finely crafted audio equipment, New York-based Symbol handcraft modern audio HIFI consoles and vinyl LP storage cabinets in the tradition of fine furniture.
Tailored Materiality

Mid-Century, part of West Elm’s new office division.

“Finish application has always been an important element of workplace design,” says Steve Delfino, vice president of corporate marketing and product management at Teknion, who believes that 2016 will see designers using color and texture to create a more varied, inspiring and personalized work environment. “We’re seeing an increased emphasis on varied materiality throughout the workplace to create environments that influence wellness and productivity,” he says.

Teknion’s upStage™ offers an assortment of material options, including textiles and wood veneer, translucent and back-painted glass, perforated metal and a range of metal and laminate finishes. “We’ve taken everyday materials and used them in unexpected ways that draw reference from residential design cues,” says Teknion. The Alumni chair by Amsterdam-based designer Jesse Visser and Geke Lensink of Dutch manufacturer eQ+ can blend into the home or office thanks to its various base options and coatings that include nickel, gold, black, black brass or white as well as a wide selection of Kvadrat fabric and leather upholstery options. Launched earlier this year at NeoCon, the 75+ pieces in West Elm’s new office division are designed to make the office feel less ‘office-like’ with finish options that run the gamut of style, from steel and white laminate to walnut veneer and antiqued bronze
Seamless Functionalities

Le Lit Nationa’s Origami Bed by Elise Fouin.

Seasoned retail and trade show editor Heloisa Righetto of trend forecasting and analysis service WGSN Lifestyle predicts a move towards furniture that facilitates numerous different activities. “Although multifunctional furniture is not a new concept, these added functions are becoming more intuitive, more fluid and less about novelty.”

Made up of modular units, including tables, poufs, cabinets and sofas in various fabrics, Werner Aisslinger’s ‘Bikini Island’ sofa system for Moroso can be customized to integrate as many functions as needed. “Life in the living room has changed quite a lot recently,” explains Aisslinger. “Families and their kids are chilling with different activities—reading, downloading files, writing emails, gaming, chatting with friends, watching movies on a pad, relaxing, talking, thinking or meditating.” Induction-charging stations are gradually being integrated into furniture and lighting as standard. Earlier this year Ikea introduced a series of lamps, bedside tables and desks that are able to wirelessly charge any portable electronic devices that are placed on top of them. The headboard of Le Lit National’s Origami bed by Elise Fouin is covered in decorative pockets that double as storage while the reverse serves as a desk.
70s-Inspired

Chouchin pendant lamps for Foscarini.

1970s-inspired furnishings are set to make a comeback in 2016 according to New York-based hospitality designer and entrepreneur Stacy Garcia. “The relaxed, free-spirited nature of that era has been attractive to the fashion industry and has quickly moved towards interiors as well. Many design elements of the 70s were bold, raw and globally-fueled, as a response to the changing social and political environment of that time.”

Stacy Garcia’s Calabasas furniture collection for D’Style takes its design cues from the wanderlust of the global traveler and the boldness of the 1970’s nonconformist. Musician Lenny Kravitz turned his hand to furniture design in 2015 when he paired with CB2 to launch his debut line of furniture, lighting and accessories. Inspired by 1970s New York club culture, the 20-piece collection features polished metals, bold geometric patterns, walnut and sheepskin. Ionna Vautrin’s Chouchin pendant lamps for Foscarini evoke the 1970s with their lantern shapes and avocado green, grey and orange colorways.
Agile Planning

QuickStand by Humanscale.

The flexible office trend has dominated the contract furniture industry in recent years and in 2016 Steve Delfino, vice president of corporate marketing and product management at Teknion, expects the theme to evolve. “There is an increased expectation for flexibility and adaptability in the workplace,” he says. “Now clients are requesting products that can adjust to an ever-changing work landscape.”

Catering to offices of anything between two and two hundred, Poppin’s Series A Desk System has an easy, tool-free construction that lets growing offices quickly and effortlessly create new different desk configurations. hiSpace is an expanding height-adjustable bench design from Teknion that can create benching environments for two to sixteen users. Named as the best office accessory of the decade at our very own Interior Design 2015 Best of Year Awards, the QuickStand by Humanscale is a height-adjustable workstation that attaches to the back of any work surface to transform it into a height adjustable desk.

Source: http://www.interiordesign.net/articles/11310-design-forecast-10-trends-to-watch-for-in-2016/

Dunkin’ Donuts, NHL team up for corporate alliance

Dunkin’ Donuts, Canton, Mass., and the National Hockey League (NHL) announced a multi-year agreement, making Dunkin’ Donuts the official U.S. coffee, doughnut and breakfast sandwich of the NHL. The partnership, which marks Dunkin’ Donuts’ first national sports league partnership, will officially launch during the 2017 Bridgestone NHL Winter Classic outdoor game, which takes place Jan. 2, 2017, in St. Louis.

As part of the deal, Dunkin’ Donuts will be prominently featured at several of the NHL events, including the NHL Winter Classic, NHL All-Star Weekend, NHL Stadium Series and the NHL’s year-long Centennial celebration. Dunkin’ Donuts will be included in advertising, LED Signage and jumbotron displays, as well as on-site activations at each event, the company says.

Dunkin’ Donuts also will have significant presence across NHL’s broadcast and digital platforms in the United States, it says. Dunkin’ Donuts also has a multi-million dollar partnership with NBC Sports that will include custom in-game features and dashboard visibility, as well as advertising across broadcast, digital and social media channels beginning Jan. 2 and continuing throughout the NHL season.

New York Rangers captain Ryan McDonagh and Boston Bruins center David Backes will join Dunkin’ Donuts as national brand spokespersons. McDonagh and Backes will be featured in a series of advertisements, along with U.S. Women’s Team Captain and star of the Boston Pride, Meghan Duggan, it adds.

“As the NHL celebrates its Centennial year, we are thrilled to be partnering with such an iconic league, giving our fans many more opportunities to engage with their favorite hockey teams,” said Tom Manchester, vice president of field marketing for Dunkin’ Brands, in a statement. “NHL fans, much like Dunkin’ Donuts fans, are some of the most loyal, energetic and passionate fans around. Dunkin’ Donuts’ coffee, doughnuts and breakfast sandwiches are sure to keep hockey fans running throughout the season.”

Dave Lehanski, senior vice president of business development and global partnerships for NHL, added: “This groundbreaking deal, marking the NHL as the first professional sports league partner for Dunkin’ Donuts reflects the power and reach of the NHL brand and our ever-growing fan base. Dunkin’ Donuts’ coffee, doughnuts and breakfast sandwiches are synonymous with hockey at all levels — whether you’re a hockey fan, parent or player. We’re excited and proud to welcome Dunkin’ Donuts to our NHL family and look forward to working together to engage hockey fans all across the country.”

For a limited time, Dunkin’ Donuts also will offer special NHL team logo doughnuts throughout the season at participating U.S. restaurants in select markets, it adds.

Prior to launching a league-wide partnership with the NHL, Dunkin’ Donuts has maintained a history of local partnerships with several prominent NHL franchises, including the Boston Bruins, Chicago Blackhawks, Nashville Predators, New York Rangers, Philadelphia Flyers, Pittsburgh Penguins, Tampa Bay Lightning and Washington Capitals, the company says. As a result of Dunkin’ Donuts’ partnership with the NHL, the Anaheim Ducks, Arizona Coyotes, Colorado Avalanche, Dallas Stars, San Jose Sharks and St. Louis Blues have joined the brand’s roster of local NHL team sponsorships. Additionally, Dunkin’ Donuts became the first official corporate sponsor of the new National Women’s Hockey League in December 2015 and entered into a partnership with USA Hockey that includes designation as the Official Coffee Shop of the U.S. Women’s National Team in February 2016, it adds.

Source: http://www.bevindustry.com/articles/89822-dunkin-donuts-nhl-team-up-for-corporate-alliance