Trends

Almost 70 percent of hospitality staff looking to change jobs, finds survey

CatererGlobal has called the results ‘concerning’

Close to 70 percent of hospitality workers are looking to change jobs in the next 12 months, with many of them based in the Middle East.

That is according to research conducted by hospitality job board CatererGlobal.com, who surveyed 1,500 hospitality workers, 46 percent of which are in this region.

With the COVID-19 pandemic creating job uncertainty for all industries, CatererGlobal saw an alarming spike in how many people were looking to change jobs. Of those surveyed, 67 percent are planning to make a career move in the next 12 months, with 54 percent looking to change employers.

“These figures continue to cause concern and should, rightly, cause employers to sit up and consider how they might change the course for any staff considering leaving, said Jeremy Vercoe, global manager for CatererGlobal.com.

Since we saw high rates of planned mobility last year, we’ve been giving this an extra focus with clients, however, this year’s results indicate that, across the industry, there is still a lot more to be done,” Vercoe continued.

In relation to the pandemic, 43 percent said their employers had provided training in order to ‘upskill’ their staff outside of their current department, only half (49 percent) of respondents claimed their businesses delivered staff programmes in response to the pandemic.

“While this is a promising start, there is still a significant opportunity to provide greater training and development across multiple key business themes, to allow teams to thrive both professionally and with their state-of-mind,” added Vercoe.

One-third of respondents (33 percent) indicated they were placed on unpaid leave, 15 percent were asked to work from home and 17 percent were made redundant. Just 22 percent continued to work as usual without any change. Overall, more than half (53 percent) of respondents indicated their organisations were suspended as a result of the pandemic.

Source: Hotelier Middle East

The 10 best food TV shows to watch on lockdown

Isolation draws us into a closer relationship with the telly but food TV offers more than just a chance to catch up on recipes and techniques. Over recent years, programmes have moved away from “stand and stir” and are now an excellent excuse for all manner of science, cultural history, humour, escapism and pure entertainment.

Anthony Bourdain

Amazon Prime, 2002-2018

I love a tight 27 minutes on thrifty ways with mince as much as the next food nerd but, with everyone else gone to bed and everything else going to hell, it’s always going to be me and Anthony Bourdain. I love the early stuff such as A Cook’s Tour (2002-3, Food Network/Amazon Prime) which see him reeling around Ho Chi Minh City, dressed like Joe Strummer and jabbering into a lo-fi, hand-held video camera. But there is so much more to choose from. No Reservations (2005-12,Travel Channel/Amazon Prime) allowed Bourdain nine seasons to develop his compelling combination of chill and total engagement with his subject. By around season four, any idea of “celebrity chef” is subsumed in a search for challenging locations, fascinating and underrepresented people and increasingly honest examinations of his own flawed past. Parts Unknown (2013-18, CNN/Amazon Prime) contains my two favourite episodes. New Jersey (season 5, episode 6) is an elegiac film that sees him visiting his childhood home with his brother, and in Rome (season 8, episode 9) he is guided around the city by Asia Argento, with whom he later formed a relationship.

Chef’s Table

Netflix, 2015-present

Did you enjoy This Is Spinal Tap or the The Life of Rock with Brian Pern? The comedy of spoof “rockumentary” lies in the uncalibrated self-regard of the subjects and the breathless complicity of the film-maker, so you’re going to love Chef’s Table. From the bombastic Vivaldi over the titles to the shots of Dan Barber, running while philosophising, or Francis Mallmann on his private island, hewing logs and talking about the creative power of sex, it’s difficult to imagine that the first series wasn’t all an expensively executed troll. But that was back in 2015, when we wanted our chefs to be artist/gods/rockstars of their generation and American documentary-makers still had little enough irony to support the idea.

As the series progressed they began to profile more female chefs and some of the resulting shows are outstanding. Jeong Kwan, cooking at the Chunjinam Hermitage in South Korea is therapeutic to watch, Cristina Martinez at the South Philly Barbacoa and Mashama Bailey at The Grey in Savannah, Georgia are inspiring, and our own Asma Khan is given space to properly expand on Indian food in the UK. Someone, somewhere turned down the ego dial.

The Taco Chronicles

Netflix, 2019

Carlos Perez Osorio’s show will make you believe that there might actually be a future for intelligent food programmes on TV. Each of the six half-hour episodes covers a different type of taco in obsessive depth. The show is in Spanish and subtitled, a serious deep dive into the subject, but delivered with a brilliant tone – fantastically, poetically hyperbolic about street food, enthusiastic but self-aware.

The Chef Show

Netflix, 2019 to present

Jon Favreau is a producer and actor who starred in the movie Chef, with his chef mate Roy Choi, and quite fancies himself as a chef. In The Chef Show (see what he did there?), they hang out in the borrowed kitchens of their Hollywood buddies. It has about as much script or editorial control as a podcast, but with full quality video. What is most noticeable is that there’s no attempt to give recipes … in fact, all the ingredients seem to arrive pre-prepped and measured in tiny plastic pots. I want to hate the OG bro-fest format, but it’s actually compelling if you relax into it.

Jeremiah Tower: The Last Magnificent

Netflix, 2016

A feature-length documentary about the man who managed to arrive in San Francisco just in time to be a driving force in California cuisine. His rise from untrained kitchen boy at Chez Panisse to the very peak of his industry, his acclaimed restaurant, Stars, and his catastrophic crash-and-burn makes for a brilliant, unflinching profile.

Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat

Netflix, 2018

Samin Nosrat is another graduate of Chez Panisse whose highly successful 2017 book Salt, Fat, Acid Heat was quickly turned into a four-part docuseries. The book’s simple idea of breaking cooking down into four conceptual basics enables her to travel the world in search of examples. Like our own Nadiya Hussain, she’s a natural presenter whose integrity and enthusiasm draws you in.

Ugly Delicious

(Netflix, 2018-present)

Presented by culinary wunderkind David Chang of the celebrated Momofuku restaurant group. There are parts of the early shows that are big on chest-beating, high-fiving, alpha-malery, but in the most recent he turns to important cultural issues around global cooking. He also discovers he’s going to become a dad, sheds an actual tear, and then teaches us all how to make baby food. OK, it’s a kind of predictable conversion but, if you start watching them in reverse order, they’re very enjoyable.

The Mind of a Chef

PBS, 2012-2017 – season 6 on Facebook

Takes a similarly hagiographic approach as Chef’s Table but allows each featured chef more space to cook. Gabrielle Hamilton – troubled, driven, phenomenally talented – comes across particularly well. It’s probably to her credit that our own April Bloomfield actually looks uncomfortable throughout her episodes, awkwardly attempting Delia-esque presentation while the directors try to extract some sort of life philosophy or grandiose soundbite out of her. It’s actually charming and should make us proud.

Source: The Guardian

5 Apps That Hospitality Professionals Should Have on Their Phone

Image result for Hospitality people on phone

It’s 2020 and it’s official: we can’t live without apps. A little over 12 years ago, Apple launched its App Store with just 500 apps; now there are over five million mobile applications available for both iOS and Android users. You wouldn’t be alone in thinking, how did I even leave the house in 1998 without Google Maps? Today, the average smartphone user has over 80 apps on their phone and uses up to 40 of them each month.

Smart intuitive apps have been game changers for the hospitality industry, with guests more tech-savvy than ever. And for many working in the hospitality industry, our phones are also an indispensable tool for doing our jobs well. But, with millions of apps to choose from, how can you find the select few that can help you work better, stay up-to-date on industry news and trends, and enhance your career? Don’t worry, we are here to help you.

The following list is by no means comprehensive – there are hundreds of super useful apps out there for hospitality professionals to try out (don’t see your favorite app here? Tell us about it!). We currently love these five apps the most:

Vivino

1. Vivino (iOS | Android)

As a hospitality professional, you’re expected to know about wine. Or at least that’s what all your friends think. Tap into your inner sommelier with the Vivino app to discover wine which has crowdsourced ratings and reviews. Our favorite thing about this app is its scan feature, which allows you to take a photo of any wine label and instantly get detailed information on the wine, including suggested food pairings. Also, celebrity chef Jamie Oliver is a member, and his reviews are not only helpful but highly entertaining!

Hosco

2. Hosco. (iOS | Android)

If you’re reading this and you don’t have the Hosco app – what are you waiting for? Hosco’s mobile application gives you access to world-class culinary, tourism, and hotel jobs worldwide. It’s also your one-stop-shop for breaking industry news and trending stories. One distinctive feature of the Hosco app that users love is the Invite Your Friends feature which allows you to grow your network faster.

Untappd

3. Untappd (iOS | Android)

Beer aficionados and aspiring cicerones, we didn’t forget you when making this list. Like Vivino, but for beer, this app is the go-to source for discovering new beers, rating them, and connecting with members of the beer brewing and drinking community. The coolest feature of this app is the Upcoming Events feature, which keeps you in the loop on tastings, festivals, and all things beer-related in your area.

Duolingo

4. Duolingo (iOS | Android)

Hospitality professionals understand better than anyone the importance of speaking a second (or third) language. Proficiency in a foreign language can help you edge out the competition for a coveted position, and even land a higher salary. Thinking of applying for a job abroad, or just want to build your CV? Now’s the time to brush up on that foreign language you’ve been dreaming of learning or perfecting. Duolingo is easy to use, allows you to set weekly goals, and it’s great for visual learners. Best of all, it’s free.

Headspace

5. Headspace (iOS | Android)

Mindfulness. There’s been a buzz around this psychological process in recent years and now it’s available at your fingertips, thanks to Headspace. The app offers guided meditation, including breathing and visualization techniques, for everyone from total beginners to the most mindful Zen masters. Not sure where to start? Hospitality professionals love the Finding Focus and Productivity packs, as well as the Business travel mini session. Along with over 8.5 million users, including Virgin Group founder Richard Branson, we love this app’s straightforward, no-frills design and approach. It offers moments of calm and clarity on even the busiest, most hectic days. Try up to 10 free sessions before subscribing for a monthly, yearly or lifetime fee.

So, there you have it. Thanks to these five free apps you can: boost your wine and beer knowledge, keep up to date with the best hospitality news and job opportunities, begin to learn a new language, and totally disconnect your mind. Download them today and your life in hospitality will become just that little bit easier.

Source: worldchefs.hosco.com

The full English breakfast could “die” with the next generation’

One in five Brits under 30 have never had a fry up

A full English breakfast including sausages, grilled tomatoes and mushrooms, eggs, bacon, baked beans and bread

The full English breakfast could soon be a thing of the past, a new study has found.

The research says that the classic English fry up could die out within a generation, as almost one in five Brits under 30 have never had a full English breakfast.

The nationwide survey found that 27 per cent of the 2,000 participants aged 18 to 30 said black pudding was the most unappealing thing about a traditional fry up.

A quarter (24 per cent) of respondents said a fry up was ‘too greasy’ and 42 per cent said it ‘reminded them of men in vests hanging around in transport cafes’.

The greasy bacon, ‘lukewarm’ baked beans and processed sausages were also factors that put young Brits off the classic and 71 per cent of respondents said they would rather have smoked salmon and scrambled eggs, smashed avocado on toast and oatmeal pancakes for breakfast.

Ellie Glason, Director of polling firm Ginger Research, who commissioned the study said in a statement: “The study found also that over half of young adults believe Britain is becoming more health conscious and shunning traditional English meals like fried breakfasts, bangers and mash and pie and chips.”

Items in a full English breakfast can differ depending on where in the UK you live, but common items include bacon, eggs, sausages, baked beans, fried tomatoes, fried mushrooms, black pudding and toast.

The breakfast dates back to the 1800s where Victorians served it to display wealth and hospitality.

Source: The Evening Standard

8 of the UK’s best restaurants – as chosen by Britain’s top chefs

Secret gems and neighbourhood hideaways where chefs love to eat: from a cafe lunch in Cornwall to a tasting menu on the Scottish coast

Silk Road, London SE5

Chosen by James Cochran, chef-owner, Restaurant 1251

I’ve lived in south London for 15 years and the neighbourhood restaurant that stands out is Silk Road in Camberwell. I’m a massive fan of their Xinjiang style of Chinese cooking and they do many unusual things that you don’t normally see in Chinese restaurants in this country. I associate kebabs with Turkish or Greek food, but here they do lamb skewers which they cover in delicious Asian spices and chargrill really quickly. Their dumplings are on point as well. In fact, everything is packed full of flavour, but nicely balanced. The restaurant is very minimalistic, drinks are BYO and the food is very affordable – spend £20 and you’re full.

Inver, Strathlachan, Argyll

Chosen by James Lowe, chef and co-founder, Lyle’s and Flor

Inver is on a beautiful part of the west coast of Scotland, a couple of hours’ drive from Glasgow. It’s not over the top like some destination restaurants; there’s no desire to create theatrics. The dinner is fantastic, and it’s worth staying so you can have breakfast and its more casual lunch. We went for new year and stayed in a bothy by the water. For dinner, we had seaweed ice-cream with caviar, which was stunning, and an amazing langoustine dish with carrot. Pam Brunton and Rob Latimer run the place: she’s in the kitchen, he runs front of house. I’ve got a lot of admiration for them, because running a restaurant in a remote area is really difficult and they’ve made it work.

The Dawnay Arms, Newton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire

Chosen by Tommy Banks, head chef, Black Swan

I quite like fine dining, but I think what everybody really wants is an awesome Sunday roast and so often it’s disappointing. The Dawnay Arms is incredible. If I haven’t any got any plans for Sunday, I will be there. I’ve gone four weekends in a row before. I like to sit in the front bar because I can take my dog; first we go for a walk by the river, then call into the pub and have a roast. The Smiths run it: Martel is in the kitchen and Kerry runs the front of house. Obviously, we’re blessed up here with good produce, but they use all the best stuff. They don’t charge enough for what they do. I kind of wish I owned it myself – but then I wouldn’t want to eat there, so I suppose it’s best.


St Kew Cafe
, Bodmin, Cornwall

Chosen by Paul Ainsworth, chef-owner, Paul Ainsworth at No 6

Not far from where I live, near the St Kew highway, is a farm shop with a cafe. My wife Emma and I go there as much as we can, and every time, to our amazement, there’s a table available. It’s probably only a matter of time before more people find out about it and it becomes impossible to find a seat. It’s so welcoming – the chef will always look up and give you a wave – and the food is so consistent, even if it’s just a bacon sandwich or a full English. The ethos is to showcase everything Cornish and it uses proper sourdough bread, nice butter, great bacon. Whether avocado with poached eggs on toast or a ham sandwich, the food is brilliant every single time. I can’t believe this is just up the road. It’s fantastic.

Singburi, London E11

Chosen by Erchen Chang, co-founder, Bao and Xu

This is a neighbourhood Thai restaurant that’s cheap and fun and refreshing, and the food is just pure tasty. It’s run by a mother and son. I went a couple of months ago with a big group and we ordered the whole blackboard menu. My favourite dishes were the clam with garlic, chilli and basil, which was simple and classic; the jungle curry crab, which was really dirty and hard to eat (you have to suck on the crab); and boat noodle soup which had that really good medicinal taste from dried roots that’s hard to find in London. The interior is bare. They have some very sensual fruit posters from the 80s on the wall, and photos of customers from years and years ago eating in the restaurant. There’s not much other decoration, but I think that makes the food stand out. I’m moving quite close to Singburi, so it’s going to be my local. I can’t wait.

The Canton Arms, London, SW8

Chosen by Margot Henderson, chef and co-owner, Rochelle Canteen

This is my local, and has everything I enjoy about a pub: it’s friendly, warm and not too flashy. It’s familiar, and perfect on a rainy day. On top of that, it has great drinks and superb food. The dining room is cosy, with the most delicious menu – I always love the way it reads. Quite classic, but modern – it might have provencal beef shin. The blackboard menu has about four sharing dishes on it and they go much further than it says, which makes it great value. It’s gentle food for families and friends, served in big Le Creuset dishes, with a generous spirit.

Chesters by the River, Ambleside, Cumbria

Chosen by Simon Rogan, chef-owner, L’Enclume

On a day off, I like to go for lunch to this riverside cafe. I sit outside, relax and eat really tasty vegan and vegetarian food. The food has all sorts of influences – a bit of Moroccan, through to Chinese, biryanis, flame-grilled pizzas – but the main stars are the vegetables. It’s not doing it justice calling it a cafe, but that’s what it is. You can take away, and there’s a shop associated with it. The staff are friendly, the atmosphere is nice and the quality is great. My staff were always telling me how amazing it was, and it took me a while to get there. Now I can see why they love it

Tá Tá Eatery at Tayēr/Elementary, London EC1

Chosen by Jeremy Chan, head chef and co-owner, Ikoyi

Tá Tá Eatery is Zijun Meng and his partner Ana Gonçalves. If you took the food out of the context, which is very casual, and put it in a fine dining setting, it would stand out above everything else. Meng uses British produce with his Chinese heritage and some of Ana’s Portuguese flavour profiles in beautiful, intricate plates. I really like the way he’ll serve you pork that’s been aged 100 days, and you’re eating something he’s thought about 100 days earlier. It’s the same deep thinking you’d get in the best restaurants but he’s doing it in a cocktail bar, at a four-seater counter. They do the bar food and also a tasting menu. It’s him and a small induction hob, making these beautiful plates of food in a hectic space. It’s a bit rowdy, and it’s fun. But it’s almost showing you how hard London is as a city for entrepreneurial creative chefs like them to survive.

Source: The Guardian

Most Instagrammable Desserts in the U.S.

Creamberry’s Cotton Candy Burrito

@creamberrylv/Instagram

What’s better than a regular burrito? How about one made of cotton candy.

Customers at Creamberry in Las Vegas can order this cavity-inducing confection stuffed with all of their favorites. The Cotton Candy Burrito combines your choice of ice cream flavor with a variety of candy toppings, all wrapped inside brightly colored cotton candy.

New Territories’ Bubble Waffle Ice Creams

@newterritoriesny/Instagram

New York City-based ice cream shop New Territories has embraced a Hong Kong street food trend — the bubble waffle — and combined it with artisan ice cream flavors like earl gray and honeycomb.

With a light and airy cone and tons of tantalizing toppings, these desserts are true culinary works of art.

Alinea’s Edible Helium Balloon

@thealineagroup/Instagram

Introducing a dessert that’s lighter than air — literally.

You might recognize this Chicago restaurant from its appearance on the Netflix series “Chef’s Table.” The three-Michelin-starred restaurant, Alinea, is known for inventive culinary creations and its edible helium balloon is no different. Made from inverted sugar flavored with natural fruit essences, this helium-filled speciality hovers over diners’ tables attached to a string made from dehydrated apple.

Dominique Ansel Bakery’s Chocolate Chip Cookie Shot

@dominiqueansel/Instagram

From the bakery that brought you the cronut comes the next big thing in dessert innovation.

New York City’s Dominique Ansel Bakery created the chocolate chip cookie shot the year after the cronut, and it has since drawn similar lines of customers. The comforting treat combines a warm chocolate chip cookie shaped like a shot glass with homemade, cold-infused Tahitian vanilla milk that visitors pour into the treat themselves before enjoying.

In addition to its location in New York City, you can find the Dominique Ansel Bakery in Los Angeles and London. 

Kamehameha Bakery’s Poi-Glazed Donut

@spoon_hawaii/Instagram

From the outside, the donuts at Honolulu’s Kamehameha Bakery in Oahu look totally normal. But break one open and you’ll discover a gooey, vibrant purple center.

The bakery’s poi-glazed donuts — which pay homage to the traditional Hawaiian dish, made from fermented taro root — have drawn crowds since 1971.

Bonus: this bakery opens at 3 a.m., which means it’s perfect for late-night cravings.

Jardin at Wynn Las Vegas’ Fleur Cake

@rickyb899/Instagram

The phrase “almost too pretty to eat” has never been more true than at the Jardin at the Wynn Las Vegas.

The restaurant’s fanciful fleur cake perfectly resembles a pot full of pansies. While the edible pansies are real, the terra cotta pot is actually a layered chocolate cake coated with cocoa butter spray.

The dessert takes at least an hour to assemble and has quickly become one of the Jardin’s most requested dishes.

Sugar Factory’s King Kong Sundae

@thesugarfactory/Instagram

This aptly named behemoth sundae starts with 24 scoops of ice cream covered in hot fudge, caramel and strawberry sauce. Toppings include — but are certainly not limited to — sliced bananas, toasted marshmallows, chocolate chip cookies, gummi bears and giant lollipops.

The impressive sundae is finished with lit sparklers and serves a cool 14 people. Try it with friends at any of the Sugar Factory’s multiple U.S. locations, including in Orlando, Las Vegas, Chicago and New York City. 

Chocolate Chair’s Dragon Breath

@snorlax911/Instagram

The Dragon Breath at Los Angeles’ Chocolate Chair is as much a dessert as it is a performance. These crunchy puffed pearls are filled with liquid nitrogen and have a hint of fruity flavor that many customers say is akin to Fruit Loops. The pearls break open when bitten into, releasing the nitrogen and transforming the eater into a smoke-breathing dragon.

This sweet shop isn’t just blowing smoke — Dragon Breath has made serious social media waves.

Black Tap’s Crazy Shakes

@blacktaplv/Instagram

If there was ever a dessert that could give you a cavity just by looking at it, it would be one of Black Tap’s monstrous milkshakes. With locations in New York City and Las Vegas, Black Tap’s makes self-proclaimed “crazy shakes” that almost need to be seen to be believed.

These ice cream creations are true gravity-defying feats that are sure to stun your taste buds and your followers.

8 Food trends you will see in 2019

1. “Ugly” food will shine.

Food companies have long been in the habit of trashing ingredients that aren’t pretty enough to sell, but conscious consumers are catching wind. The battle against food waste isn’t new—chef Dan Barber’s wasteED campaign encourages the use of food scraps and “ugly” produce in restaurants, and plenty of farmers and merchants outside of the big supermarket chains have never been shy about selling misshapen goods. But it’ll gain even more momentum in 2019.

2. Faux meat will be your go-to snack.

According to the Whole Foods report, snacks like mushroom-based faux cracklin’, soy-based jerky, and mushroom “bacon chips” will continue to gain momentum in 2019, as an alternative to classic packaged meat snacks like beef jerky and pork rinds.

Taub-Dix is on board with this shift to faux-meat snacks. “The protein that comes from plant foods can count towards your daily intake,” she says. While individual plant-based proteins aren’t complete proteins, you can get all of the essential amino acids (the building blocks of both protein and our own lean tissue) by eating several different types of plant-based protein.

Meat alternative snacks made with vegetables, like mushrooms, generally don’t have much protein, but are still a nutritious snack choice. Just keep noshing on other healthy plant based snacks, too, advises Taub-Dix.

3. Coconut water will have competition.

For years, coconut water has been marketed (to great success) as a hydration miracle, hangover cure, and all-around delicious alternative to regular old water. In 2019, look out for other alternative waters to take over the beverage case.

The KIND Healthy Snacks Trend Report calls out two in particular: “Maple water, which contains less than half of the sugar of coconut water, as well as cactus water, which is promoted for skin revitalization.” While these slightly sweet waters won’t hurt you, the Academy of Nutrition Dietetics says to be wary of their lofty claims. They won’t do a better job of hydrating you than regular old H20, and they have sugar without any fiber, so drinking too much could lead to a blood sugar spike.

4. Vitamins and supplements are on the outs.

Although we’re more wellness-obsessed than ever, the KIND trend report predicts that processed vitamins and supplements will finally be on their way out. Instead, we’re shifting toward a sharper focus on meeting nutrient needs with whole foods. This isn’t new. The USDA dietary guidelines clearly state that “nutritional needs should be met primarily from foods, and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has long advised meeting nutrient needs by eating as varied a diet as possible, instead of relying on expensive vitamins and supplements (which, BTW, don’t need FDA approval and may not even contain the nutrients they say they do).

5. Jackfruit will be the new go-to meat substitute.

Jackfruit is a popular meat alternative already being used in place of items like barbecue pulled pork,” according to the Whole Foods trend report. The fruit is native to Southeast Asia, and is also grown in parts of Africa and South America. Americans have been using it as a meat substitute for a few years now (thanks to a stringy texture that mimics pulled pork or beef), but 2019 will be the year that pulled jackfruit really takes off.

6. You might finally learn how to bake bread.

“Bread baking is on the rise, especially when it comes to fermented loaves like sourdough,” according to the Pinterest’s 100 top trends for 2019. Kuhn agrees that people are increasingly interested in cooking more at home, and that baking bread can be a fun and delicious culinary experience.

But, she says it’s still totally fine to just buy your loaf. “On the market today, there are a lot of extremely healthy breads, so you can find great options,” she says. Look for 100-percent whole grain on the label, and mix things up by trying a bread baked with a new-to-you grain, like amaranth or kamut.

7. Your grocery shopping experience will go high-tech.

Tired of going to the Supermarket and sue at the check-out lane? Now many Supermarket chains and even Amazon offer to purchase all of your food items directly online, then deliver to your doorstep. You get fresh, chilled and frozen foods with a click of the mouse, delivered daily. Great for elderly and people who are not

8. Your fruit basket will get a tropical spin.

Sick of kiwi, blueberries? You may be in luck.                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Whole Foods is predicting that tropical fruits like guava, dragonfruit, starfruit, and passionfruit will take center stage this year.

If you’re sick of your usual apple a day, swap in one of these tropical fruits every once in a while. Different fruits have slightly different nutrient profiles, but all are packed with fiber, vitamins, and healthy carbs, explains Keri Gans, R.D., author of The Small Change Diet. Any type of fruit is a great choice for a snack or as part of a meal, and changing things up can help keep you excited about getting your five-a-day.

source: www.womanshealthmag.com

192.168.0.1 – 192.168.o.1 Login Admin Password

192.168.0.1 (IP for TP-Link router,Linksys switch and NETGEAR switch) is the default IP address of your remote switch login or ADSL modem. This IP address is the piece of processing plant settings, it would be effortlessly changed through a switch board. With the assistance of the product application by means of a web association keeping in mind the end goal to the majority of the issues experienced can be entered effectively and setup settings can be accomplished.

What should be possible with 192.168.0.1

When you entered 192.168.0.l Admin IP address with your switch, you would be completely qualified as the information. After your login, switch programming can make changes with respect to the offer procedure. In the wake of logging the IP address, arrange administration, security choices, IP Qos, DNS, Proxy, LAN, WAN, WLAN settings, DSL, DHCP customer, PPPOE, MAC, WPS and DSL, you can play out all the blocking and different modifications.

How to Connect to a Router through 192.168.1.1?

  • Snap http://192.168.0.1
  • You can type physically that http://192.168.o.1 – t the address into your program being referred to physically, you can duplicate or you can sign in by tapping on the catch on our site. All the while, we confronted the most clients is to enter the wrong secret word mistakes. In the event that you don’t have the foggiest idea about your username and watchword, you should take after our written work on ways you can gain from our under explanation.

What would you be able to do on the off chance that you overlook your remote switch’s client name and secret word?

In the event that you overlooked your remote switch’s client name and watchword, the main way is reset your switch or modem for the industrial facility settings. There is a concealed reset catch on each sort of remote switch or ADSL Modem. At the point when your switch working, by utilizing a needle or a toothpick by hanging on the catch for 10 seconds turns back your switch to processing plant settings. In this procedure, it is typical to break your web association in light of the fact that your current Internet settings to be reset. Note: If you have insufficient data, it is clearly suggested that you ought to get assistance from a man who has that sort of knowledge.About 192.168.0.1.

Culinary trends to watch for in 2017

In the world of food, one thing is certain: Every year is sure to be more exciting than the last.

Chefs push boundaries a little more each year, challenging our taste buds with what they put on our plates. Home cooks gain confidence with every meal, which leads to cooking led by intuition – often the best kind. Farmers harvest new produce, inviting us to take chances on unfamiliar ingredients grown in our own backyards.

Even the very idea of eating evolves with each passing year: The tradition of sitting down to three home-cooked meals has made way for a culture that enjoys breakfasts on the go, healthful snacks throughout the day and dinners comprised out of small plates.

So what does 2017 have in store for us? According to industry experts who predict food trends each year, we can look forward to ethnic flavors and spices, food halls, house-made charcuterie, artisan ice creams, and vegetables as the stars of a meal.

We gathered information from the National Restaurant Association, which polls more than 1,000 professional chefs each year; The James Beard Foundation and restaurant consulting firm Baum + Whiteman; read on for a detailed look at what you will be eating this year.

Spice things up

First things first – get yourself a jar of turmeric. The yellow powder, prized for its anti-inflammatory properties, is most often found in curries but has many other uses in the kitchen. Stir it into scrambled eggs and soups, toss with roasted vegetables, mix into smoothies or blend with almond milk and grated ginger for a soothing drink. Start with a small amount: The flavor is mild and earthy but slightly bitter.

Other spices to try this year are harissa, a North African hot chili pepper paste or powder; peri peri, a South African hot sauce made with African bird’s eye chillies; ras el hanout, a spicy and floral Moroccan blend of more than a dozen spices; and shichimi, a Japanese mixture made with ground chiles, tangerine peel and flakes of nori, or dried seaweed.

If you need a little sweet with your spice, no worries: “As a nation we seem to have crossed the fine line between pleasure and pain,” said Baum + Whiteman. “But smart chefs are balancing the heat, often with sweetness.”

FIND IT: The hot chicken biscuit – fried chicken with hot sauce and honey on a homemade biscuit – served during brunch at Cardinal Provisions in Asbury Park; Korean fried chicken wings with a sauce of honey tobanjan, a spicy miso condiment, at Teak in Red Bank.

Bowled over

Every foodie with an Instagram account will tell you – food in bowls is where it’s at: oatmeal bowls, smoothie bowls, grain bowls. Things just seem to taste better when arranged in a big bowl, and the experts agree.

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“It all began innocuously with acai bowls for breakfast and then spread to fast-casual (restaurants) when chains discovered their customers were rejecting breads and wraps in favor of greens and grains,” according to Baum + Whiteman. “Office workers are discovering that takeaway bowls are less likely to spatter their laps and laptops, and chefs are finding that assembling a decorous bowl is easier and faster than the complexity of plating upscale entrees because they don’t have to fuss around with all that white space.

“What’s more,” they say. “if you hold a bowl Buddha-like while eating, you are psychologically more prone to mindfulness about your meal. You’ll also stand a better chance of catching all the flavors and textures with every bite and think you’re full a lot faster, even if you chuck the white carbs.”

FIND IT: Ramen – chicken or Berkshire pork belly with soft-boiled eggs – at Cornerstone Kitchen & Tap in Jackson; polenta with grilled halloumi cheese, chile and cilantro at Talula’s in Asbury Park

Vegetables as the star

“Vegetables in 2017 will extend their domination of the dinner plate, shoving animal protein to the edges – or off the plate altogether,” experts say. “We’re seeing a surge of serious chefs tilting their menus toward vegetables, but equally significant is the commotion among fast-casual chains.”

This refers to places like Sweetgreen, with locations in New York and across the country, and Beefsteak in Washington D.C.: Both are heavily focused on vegetables and have been very well received.

“It is no secret that Americans are eating less meat (26% of consumers said so last year) and that vegetarian/flexitarian diets (are) going mainstream,” reports Baum + Whiteman.

The James Beard Foundation says cauliflower is the new kale; the oft-overlooked cruciferous veggie has been growing in popularity lately. Chefs chop it small and use it in place of rice and to make pizza crusts, and some even serve thickly sliced “steaks” as an entree.

FIND IT: Zoodles, or yellow and green zucchini “noodles,” with asparagus pesto at Harvest Local Seasonal Cuisine in Farmingdale; wild mushroom tacos at The Belmonte in Red Bank; cauliflower-topped pizza at B2 Bistro + Bar in Red Bank

Ice cream evolution

For a few years, mint chocolate chip was all the rage. Then came fro-yo and vegan ice cream.

This year, things are going to get a little crazier.

Last year, Joe D’Esposito opened an ice cream shop in Belmar that specializes in scoops served in fresh-baked waffles. Then he started making an outrageous dessert that experts predict will be everywhere this year.

D’Esposito calls his creation the sideshow shake; the confection is an Australian-born treat known there as the freakshake. “They’re pretty wild,” he said. “It’s a milkshake with ice cream piled on top and all kinds of (toppings) stuck to it, like giant lollipops, cotton candy, chocolate-covered potato chips or pretzels, caramel corn.”

Keeping with the veggie craze, trend watchers predict the rise of ice creams and pops made with avocado, sweet corn, sweet pepper, sweet potato and pumpkin.

A third ice cream trend is Thai rolled ice cream, which starts with liquid ice cream base poured onto an icy cold metal plate. It is scraped quickly with metal paddles, add-ins are mixed in, then it firms and is shaped into rolls.

FIND IT: Sideshow shakes at Coney Waffle in Belmar; Burger 25 in Toms River, which on occasion tops shakes doughnuts from Uncle Dood’s in the township; Thai rolled ice cream at Angel’s Recipe Ice Cream in Hoboken

Meals on demand

Work, school, kids’ activities, exercise – people are busy these days. While busy people need to eat, busy people don’t always have time to shop or cook.

“Peapod, the country’s leading online grocer, recently found that most Americans (70 percent) cook the majority of their weekly dinners at home at least four nights a week, so it’s no surprise services that make it easier to do so are on the rise,” said Baum + Whiteman, which included meal kits on its list of top 10 food concept trends for 2017.

That’s where meal kit services come in. These gained major traction last year; think Blue Apron, HelloFresh and Plated. They eliminate the need to grocery shop and send pre-measured ingredients and recipes to your door.

For those who want to skip the cooking, meal delivery services are heating up, too. These are businesses run by chefs and food professionals who put effort into preparing healthy, satisfying, home-cooked food.

FIND IT: Deliboy Delivery in Old Bridge, Harbour Trading in Red Bank, Cavé in Avon, Eat Clean Bro in Freehold

WHAT TO WATCH FOR

1. Sorghum: Hailed as the new “it” grain, sorghum has more bite than couscous and is slightly sweet. The ancient grain also is gluten free.

2. New cuts of meat: shoulder tender, oyster steak, Vegas strip steak, Merlot cut

3. Street food-inspired dishes: tempura, kabobs, dumplings, pupusas (a thick, stuffed corn tortilla)

4. Savory desserts

5. Horseradish

6. Radishes

7. Jackfruit: This huge Asian fruit does double duty: Before it ripens, the meaty flesh makes a great substitute for pulled pork or chicken. Once ripened, it is sweet and juicy.

8. War on waste: Veggie extras are being turned into condiments and toppings.

9. Meat aged in whisky, sake lees (the remnants of sake production) and miso powder.

10. Caccio e pepe: In English, cheese and pepper. Traditionally found on pasta, the combination is being used to add flavor to veggies and meat.

source: http://www.dailyrecord.com/story/life/2017/01/10/culinary-trends-watch/96414058/

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